Technology

From aeroplanes with fly-by-wire controls, to supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, aeronautical technology heralds a new era in air travel.. How will aircraft meet the challenges of the 21st century?

Do you remember this justson , this American cartoon broadcast briefly in the 1960s, then again in the 1980s, which featured “the family of the future”. This family – The Jetsons – lived in an ultra-modern world, surrounded by automated gadgets where anything was possible effortlessly, at the touch of a button. Why mention this series from the 1960s here? Because the candy-colored world of the Jetsons, with its flying cars, its “Hi-Tech” devices – “smart” watches to talk to each other remotely, “smart” transport, robots and home computers – was remarkably visionary: without wearing the name, the Internet of Things was already a reality there.

Build aircraft

Let’s go back to today’s increasingly interconnected world. We, too, can fly for short daily trips or travel across the planet, but our devices are far less convenient than the Jetsonsʼ “flying saucers”. Our objective: to reach our destination quickly, at the lowest possible cost and – above all – in complete safety. In this regard, advances in the properties of the materials used to build aircraft, improving and increasing their performance and operation, have effectively helped us to travel the world faster and cheaper.

Commercial and growing market.

omposite materials play an important role. They make it possible to build lighter aircraft that consume less kerosene. Take for example Boeing. The structure of the fuselage of its B787 Dreamliner is half made of composite materials. The Boeing 747 designed in the late 1960s had only 5%. To further underscore its commitment to greener production, Boeing recently welcomed ICAO’s adoption of a carbon offset system that will help the international aviation industry meet its emissions reduction goal. Boeing said of this:

Commercial aviation is a growing market. According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), the air transport industry is progressing: from 3.8 billion passengers registered to date, it will transport 7.2 billion in 2035. The fleet of commercial aircraft, which now has 100,000 aircraft, had to follow to meet the demand. According to the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO), by 2036 approximately 94% of the commercial aircraft fleet will be equipped with next-generation technologies.

GROWING DEMAND

One of the major challenges for the aerospace industry is to meet this demand with energy efficiency that produces less carbon emissions. Faced with the increase in demand for air transport and the fundamental imperative of safety, we have radically changed the way aircraft are designed, operated and powered. They are now 70% more fuel efficient than in 2010 (IATA Vision 2050 report). We are not yet at the level of the Jetsons, but we are not far from it.

The major aviation companies know that with the growth of the aviation industry, they must take care to minimise their environmental impact. How are the major market players managing the rapid increase in air traffic with energy efficiency that eliminates the carbon footprint of aircraft? What steps are they taking to develop lighter, smarter and greener planes?

How do aircraft that consume less kerosene?

Composite materials play an important role. They make it possible to build lighter aircraft that consume less kerosene. Take for example Boeing. The structure of the fuselage of its B787 Dreamliner is half made of composite materials. The Boeing 747 designed in the late 1960s had only 5%. To further underscore its commitment to greener production, Boeing recently welcomed ICAO’s adoption of a carbon offset system that will help the international aviation industry meet its emissions reduction goal. Boeing said of this:

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